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Posts for: September, 2020

By Park Hill Dental Arts
September 23, 2020
Category: Dental Procedures
ImproveYourSmileWithTheseDentalEnhancements

In case you missed it, September is Self-Improvement Month. Don't fret if you weren't aware—we're not sure how the ninth month acquired this celebration of positive human development either. But as long as we're celebrating, do something good for yourself—like improving your smile.

If this doesn't seem like a lofty enough self-improvement goal, remember this: There's much more to a smile than its looks. Smiles “speak” a social language, allowing us to wordlessly communicate acceptance, happiness, or even sympathy. A smile is a valuable part of beginning and maintaining relationships, be they familial, social or professional.

So why not go all out and enhance your smile during Self-Improvement Month? To that end, here are a few options:

Teeth whitening. Maybe your teeth are a little yellowed. If you have mild to moderate enamel staining, consider undergoing a professional whitening procedure. We use a safe but effective solution to give you just the level of brightness you want. And with proper maintenance and occasional touch-ups, you can have a brighter smile for years.

Bonding, veneers or crowns. If your teeth have chips, heavy discolorations or other mild to moderate defects, we can offer a variety of solutions. We can bond special dental materials to repair slight defects that make a tooth look good as new. For moderate flaws, heavy staining or slight gaps, we can bond a custom-made veneer to the front of teeth to hide these imperfections. We can also cap teeth with natural-looking crowns to cover larger disfigurements.

Orthodontics. Misaligned teeth can detract from an otherwise attractive smile. Orthodontics can help—and as long as you're in good oral and general health, you can undergo bite correction at any age. Braces aren't your only option: Removable clear aligners are nearly invisible to others, and because they're removable, they make it easier to keep your teeth clean.

Dental implants. Missing teeth can definitely dim a smile. And while there are a number of restoration options, dental implants are one of the top choices. Implants not only look and feel lifelike, they're exceedingly durable. Although they may be more expensive up-front, they have been shown to last longer and tend to require less maintenance than other restorations. Dental implants are a worthwhile investment in a long-term smile.

Cosmetic enhancements like teeth whitening or bonding may require only one or two visits, while other options like orthodontics or implants can take much longer. But you can still get the ball rolling now. Make an appointment this month for a full dental exam and consultation to start your journey toward improving your smile.

If you would like more information about enhancing your smile, please contact us or schedule a consultation. To learn more, read the Dear Doctor magazine article “Cosmetic Dentistry: A Time for Change.”


ListentoEllenDeGeneresDontThinkYouCanGetAwayWithoutFlossing

This year's Carol Burnett Award, presented at the Golden Globes, goes to Ellen DeGeneres for her “outstanding contributions to the television medium on or off the screen.” This is the latest in a long list of honors for the comedienne, talk show host and activist that includes Emmys, Grammys and Teen Choice Awards. And one not quite as well-known: a 2004 “Flossy” award.

DeGeneres received this honor from the National Flossing Council in recognition of her passionate promotion of oral hygiene, particularly flossing. She wrote about its virtues in her 2003 book, The Funny Thing Is…., saying, among other things, “Don't even think for a second that you can get away with not flossing.”

DeGeneres's motivational cheerleading for flossing is helpful and necessary because, well, many of us just don't like doing it. It requires more manual dexterity than its more popular sibling, brushing. And the tendency for the floss to gunk up with plaque residue for some is simply unpleasant.

Mainly, though, many folks think brushing is enough. Not so fast, according to dental professionals. While brushing removes disease-causing bacterial plaque from broad tooth surfaces, it can't effectively get into the spaces between teeth. It takes flossing to clear plaque from these more difficult areas.

But don't fret: There are ways to make flossing an easier—and more pleasant—task.

Ask us for help. As we said before, flossing does take some hand dexterity and coordination to perform. You may also wonder if you're doing it effectively. We can provide training and tips on how to be a more effective flosser at your next visit.

Practice, practice, practice. You probably think nothing of riding a bicycle, and yet it probably took you weeks or months as a kid to become proficient. Similarly, your first attempts at flossing might feel awkward, but you'll improve with practice, so don't give up.

Brush before you floss. Most people floss before brushing, but if you tend to encounter a lot of soft plaque debris that makes flossing “icky” for you, then try brushing first to clear a good portion of it out of the way before you floss. Just be aware, most professionals believe that flossing first is better because it loosens up debris between teeth so the bubbles from the toothpaste can carry it away. But any flossing is better than no flossing!

Try flossing tools. For some people, floss picks, small pre-threaded tools you can use with one hand, seem easier to maneuver than regular floss thread. If you have issues with manual dexterity, an oral irrigator can make the task easier: This handheld device uses a stream of pressurized water to loosen and flush away plaque between teeth.

So, follow Ellen DeGeneres's advice she gave Tulane University graduates during a commencement speech: “Remember to exfoliate, moisturize, exercise…and floss.” The latter, along with brushing, will certainly help keep your teeth and gums healthy.

If you would like more information about best oral hygiene practices, please contact us or schedule an appointment. To learn more, read the Dear Doctor magazine article “Daily Oral Hygiene.”


By Park Hill Dental Arts
September 03, 2020
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health  
UnpleasantCrackedMouthCornersCanBeTreatedandPrevented

Ever have a paper cut or an irritated hangnail? They're not considered major health problems, but, boy, can they sting!

Something similar can occur in the corners of your mouth called angular cheilitis. It's also known as perleche, from the French word “to lick” (a common habit with this type of sore). It can occur at any age, with children or young adults developing it from drooling during sleep or orthodontic treatment.

Older adults, though, are more prone than younger people for a variety of reasons. Age-related wrinkling is a major factor, especially “marionette lines” that run from the mouth to the chin. Dried or thinned out skin due to exposure from cold, windy weather may also contribute to perleche.

Perleche can also develop from within the mouth, particularly if a person is experiencing restricted salivary flow leading to reduced lubrication around the lips. Poorly cleaned dentures, weakened facial supporting structure due to missing teeth, vitamin deficiencies and some systemic diseases can all lead to perleche. And if an oral yeast infection occurs around the cracked mouth corners, the irritation can worsen and prolong the healing process.

To clear up a case of cracked mouth corners, you should promptly see your dentist for treatment. Treatment will typically include some form of antifungal ointment or lozenge applied over a few days to clear up the sores and prevent or stop any infection. You might also need to apply a steroid ointment for inflammation and other ointments to facilitate healing.

To prevent future episodes, your dentist may ask you to use a chlorhexidine mouthrinse to curb yeast growth. If you wear dentures, you'll need to adopt a regular cleaning routine (as well as leaving them out at night). You might also wish to consider updated dental restorations or orthodontics to improve dental support, and help from a dermatologist if wrinkling might be a potential cause.

Cracked mouth corners won't harm you, but they can make for a miserable experience. Take steps to relieve the irritation and any future occurrence.

If you would like more information on angular cheilitis or similar oral conditions, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Cracked Corners of the Mouth.”